Recipes to Share?

Readers,

As you may have alread concluded, one of this site’s numerous weaknesses is its lack of recipes.  This fact has been pointed out to me by several regular readers (and by my own wife, bless her, who is not a regular reader).  I’d like to remedy this problem but need your help. If you have a North Carolina barbecue-related recipe to share, please send it to me at  BBQJew at gmail.com or by leaving a comment on this post. Note that I only want recipes you have a right to use; e.g., your mama’s coleslaw recipe would work but the coleslaw recipe you stole from page 126 of Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue would not.  Got it?  Good.  Your reward for sharing a recipe will be getting acknowledgment when I post the recipe and maybe even getting discovered by the producers of The Food Network’s “Next Boiled Barbecue Potato Star” or whatever.

Thanks in advance, and I’ll try and semi-regularly share recipes in the months ahead,

Porky

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Blues Skies and Barbecue at 27th Annual Festival

The weather was damn near perfect last weekend when the 27th Annual Barbecue Festival took over the streets of Uptown Lexington.  My wife and kids joined me on the Amtrak from Durham to Lexington (the one time a year the train stops there), and we were joined by dozens of other barbecue-happy passengers.  We even met some New Yorkers on the train–they’d come down from Long Island to Lexington just for the Festival, which speaks to how big the event has gotten over the years.  (Of course, maybe they were just trying to drown their Yankees’ baseball sorrows.) 

And when I say the event has gotten big, I mean it.  The Festival apparently drew a record crowd this year, with “more than 200,000” people in attendance according to the inexact-yet-official estimate.  That estimate might sound like hyberbole but if you were there–and given how large a crowd it was I am guessing you were–then you’ll have no problem believing it.  It was CROWDED, folks.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen that many people in one place and I am not sure I care to again.  But I did enjoy myself.  And luckily I ate a BBQ sandwich before the tents sold out–at 4:00 p.m., two hours before the end of the event. 

For excellent photos of the Festival, visit the website of Lexington’s daily, The Dispatch, by following this link and clicking on the October 24th festival gallery.

The Mallard Creek Barbeque

Want to be one of the lucky thousands who gets to eat barbecue while rubbing elbows with desperate politicians just days before the election?  Head on down to Charlotte, where the 81st Mallard Creek Barbeque is scheduled for this Thursday starting at 10 a.m.  The annual fundraiser is organized by Mallard Creek Presbyterian Church, as it has been since year one, and promises to serve up thousands of pounds of pig, slaw and Brunswick stew, along with a healthy dose of good cheer (as well as those pesky politicians).  The event is the largest of its kind in North Carolina so be sure you leave yourself plenty of time to soak it in.  Get directions to the Barbeque site here.

Total (BBQ) Recall

Bad news for those of you who like your barbecue with a side of salmonella: The Louisburg-based company The Murphy House has recalled over 4,900 pounds of barbecue due to possible salmonella contamination, so you’ll have to look elsewhere for your ‘cue and ‘nella fix. (Earlier this year the same company had to recall a bad batch of Brunswick stew.)

It’s a shame to see so much barbecue go to waste, but if barbecue is going to be thrown away I prefer it be the pre-packaged pork from the big plastic tubs than succulent swine from independent restaurants.  More details on the recall are available from WTVD news, including the interesting note that products from The Murphy House had been served at the North Carolina State Fair.  Here’s to hoping that any sickness related to the Fair is caused by pairing fried foods and roller coasters, not by salmonella…

BBQ Jew’s View: The Skylight Inn

4618 Lee Street, Ayden, NC
252.746.4113
No Website
Hours: Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
BBQ Jew’s Grade: A+
Porky Says: “Capitol Q indeed, Jones’ place lives up to the hype.”
 
Do A Few Things But Do Them Well

The Ayden skyline. Photo by Conor "Swine Factor" Keeney.

The Skylight Inn is not the type of restaurant that tries to be everything to everyone.  Far from it. Instead, the folks at The Skylight  do just a few things but do them as well as any barbecue joint anywhere.  The Skylight Inn is still referred to as “Jones’ Barbecue” by many old timers in deference to Pete Jones, who started the place, and the Joneses who have followed in his footsteps.  The menu that Pete Jones established when he opened The Skylight in 1947 remains nearly unchanged today.  When you set foot in The Skylight Inn your only choices are whether you want a BBQ sandwich or a tray (small, medium or large) and where to sit.  The options are limited to barbecue, slaw and skillet cornbread from a 180 year old recipe!  You might think it’d be disappointing to not have some variety on the menu, but I think I could make do with Jones’ pork-slaw-cornbread holy trinity most every day and die happy (and probably several years before I otherwise would).

“If I told you the recipe for the slaw, I’d have to shoot you in the head.”
When you visit barbecue joints and talk to the owners and cooks, you get used to the line, “I could tell you the recipe for [insert menu item], but I’d have to kill you.”  This is practically a motto for barbecue folks.  That said, The Skylight Inn was the first place I heard that line delivered by someone who was prepared to follow through on the statement.  I asked Samuel Jones how they cook their hogs and he told me he’d be happy to share, as it’s simply hard work and sticking to tradition rather than any secret.  On the other hand, he said, “If I told you the recipe for the slaw, I’d have to shoot you in the head.” Since Samuel had a handgun in his back Continue reading

27th Annual Barbecue Festival This Weekend

It’s that time of year again, time for hordes of hungry hog lovers to descend on little Lexington and devour thousands of pounds of barbecue.  Yes, the Barbecue Festival takes over the streets of downtown Uptown Lexington on Saturday for the 27th time.  The annual event often draws more than 100,000 people to Lexington, a town of just 20,000.  The Festival culminates a month full of events, including the Tour de Pig bicycle race and the Hawg Shoot air rifle competition.  For a complete schedule of Saturday’s happenings visit the entertainment section of the Festival website

This year the Festival was once again named one of the southeast’s Top 20 Events for October, a distinction that would be more impressive if there were more than 19 events taking place in the region this month.  Just kidding, The Barbecue Festival is a terrific event and worthy of its Top 20 status. I hope to see you somewhere along Main Street on Saturday. I’ll be the guy wearing the grease-stained BBQ Jew t-shirt…

Porky’s Pulpit: An Affront to My Way of Life

If there were an award for the website that is most antithetical to BBQJew.com, this one might be the winner.  After all, what could be more in conflict with the values espoused by BBQJew.com than the Christian Vegetarian Association? 

According to their website, “The Christian Vegetarian Association (CVA) is an international, non-denominational ministry of believers dedicated to respectfully promoting healthy, Christ-centered and God-honoring living among Christians.”  Their mission is threefold:

  1. To support and encourage Christian vegetarians around the world.
  2. To share with non-vegetarian Christians how a vegetarian diet can be a powerful and faith-strengthening witness to Christ’s love, compassion, and peace.
  3. To show the world that plant-based diets represent good, responsible Christian stewardship for all God’s Creation.

Hmmm, these “Christians” sound more like devil worshippers to me.  Needless to say, BBQJew.com asks all of you real Christians, Jews, Muslims, and other true believers in monotheistic (or polytheistic, pagan or animistic, we’re not picky) religions who have faith in the power of pork to make a stand against the CVA.  We urge you to take to the streets and burn some tofu (Citrus Barbeque Tofu, if you want to hit them where it hurts) to protest the CVA’s evil mission.  But don’t stay out protesting too late at night, most good barbecue places close by 8 p.m. and we’d hate for you to miss dinner.